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Last month, Ted’s ipad went missing. Since Dan wasn’t working, we couldn’t replace it, until today. I downloaded his stuff on the new one from the icloud thing, and found THREE VIDEOS by the thief (or child of). PLEASE pass this on. The ipad was Ted’s way of communicating (we have an app called TapSpeak). He’s been lost without it. Even though we replaced it, there was plenty of contact info on the ipad. They could have got it back to is. PLEASE help us find this family. IF you’re in Dubuque especially PLEASE PASS THIS ON. The most recent 3 videos are the kid with the ipad. PLEASE HELP US.

With more digging into the ipad, we found an email address for the person who has it, too.  It was obvious it belonged to a child because of the apps on it. There were also apps that had the word AUTISM in the title.  Lastly, besides the communications software, there were other apps that would indicate that it belonged to someone who had some sort of disability or cognitive problems.  The parents of this kid had to know. They knew enough to turn off FIND MY IPHONE, but not enough to realize I had it automatically sending stuff to icloud.
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Grover

Image via Wikipedia

One of the first apps I got on my son’s iPad was something I wanted for myself. The Monster at the End of This Book was one of my favorite books growing up.  When I saw it was at the iPad store, and it still had Grover, and not Elmo (which they had when my daughter was the age for this), I had to download it!

It keeps true to story, and is interactive in a seamless, appropriate manner.  It encourages the child to be involved in the story, in subtle ways. If they still don’t get what to do on a page, Grover will hint, building up the hints until the work is done.  He does it in a way, though, that suits the story. “Whatever you do, don’t touch that. Not that corner over there. That will make the page turn. You don’t want to turn the page!” Things like that, and maybe a bit of a flicker or flash to show where the child should touch.

My son is completely non-verbal, and can’t really read much at all.  He’s never been interested in reading, either.  He’ll look at I Spy books, or flip through something with a character he likes, but not much more than that.  After a while, though, Ted would read along with the book, running his finger under each word as it was said. Each word comes on the page one at a time as Grover says it, and he’s really starting to learn the relationship between what is said and what the word looks like. That interaction is probably helping him read more than the constant drilling we’ve done over the years in school, in therapy, and in the home.  He reads it every night before going to bed.  He also is engaged with it more than most other apps, without perseverating on it, reading it over and over for hours on end.  It’s also made a great reward for his educators and his therapists, because he will work for enough stars to have time with this app.

I’ve seen a number of children’s e-books, and apps based on children’s books. This is probably our favorite, and save for a handful of others, one of the better crafted ones. You can tell that not only did the software developers know what they were doing, educators and other professionals who know about development of literacy skills and children were involved. All the little touches not only make this app more enjoyable, but are a great way to help an emerging reader.

This award-winning app is $3.99 at the Apple App  store.

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If you’re a parent with a child on the spectrum, you’ve probably responded to the same annoying remarks and questions a thousand times. Here’s a handy list of responses that…you’ll probably never use out loud (but are fun to imagine using)!

via Top 10 snappy answers to annoying comments about autism | Autism Support Network.

I need to memorize these…

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I made this video today, based on actual conversations over the years.

http://www.xtranormal.com/site_media/players/jwplayer.swfhttp://www.xtranormal.com/site_media/players/embedded-xnl-stats.swf

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My son started Camp Bee A Friend this week. This camp pairs off children on the autism spectrum with their typically developing peers, sharing the camp experience together. It’s not about therapy, academics, things like that, it is camp. Real camp with camp activities. Fishing and swimming and crafts and lunch and songs and games and sports and all the typical day camp stuff — something that kids on the spectrum, particularly ones like mine, don’t really get to experience.

Now, one of my fears with Ted is that he’d be alone when we were gone. That the only people who would be with him would be obligated to. Family members, and people who work with him. Maybe a roommate in an apartment or group home. It’s one of the things that makes me sad, the thought my son may never have a partner, a family, a social life. He’s still non verbal, and he doesn’t really notice other people a lot. He doesn’t interact, usually. And since there are a lot of things he doesn’t understand, what could he bring to the table, friendship-wise? This breaks my heart on a regular basis. I try not to think about it, because it makes me want to die inside.

Well, when he got on the bus to go to camp, another kid came by. He looked at the open doors, looked over the seats, and said, “I want to sit next to Ted!” I smiled, I made a pleasant remark to one of the staff members standing there (as well as continued to discuss how Ted doesn’t eat lunch) and left.

And then proceeded to cry the entire drive home.

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Sick

Does it sound wrong for a mom to want her child to be ill?

If he was sick, then there would be a reason for what’s going on now. The crying, the screaming, the agitation, the misery, the sheer hopeless attitude he has right now.

If he isn’t sick, then it’s that random autism who knows what the hell is wrong now, and then it is back to specialists again. Psychiatrists and psychologists and developmental pediatricians and behaviorists and neurologists and it just goes to “I guess it’s the autism”. Which isn’t much of an answer at all, it might as well be, “I guess it’s because the sun is hot and water is wet and it is Sunday.”

So I hope he has a bug. Nothing bad, just maybe an upset stomach or stuffed nose or sore throat or something that will go away, and he’ll be back to his usual happy self again. Of course, since he is ‘non verbal’, I don’t know what hurts. His head, his heart, his eyes, his nose, his throat, his tummy, his ears, who knows?

No one WANTS their child sick, of course, but in our case, it beats the alternative.

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Dear Ma,
I’m sorry when we talk I only ask for more stuff,
I’m sorry I don’t tell you how much I love you enough.
I’m sorry I don’t call when I plan to come home late,
I’m sorry I take it out on you, when I’m not feeling great.
I’m sorry I’m so lazy, it couldnt’ hurt to do another chore,
I’m sorry that although you give me all you can, I always ask for more.
I’m sorry.

But,
Thank you for putting up with me and my bratty attitude,
Thanks for understanding and asking what’s wrong when I’m in a terrible mood.
Thanks for being so very strong when dad’s a thousand miles away,
Thanks for asking “How was school?” at the end of every day.
Thanks for suffering through child labor in a hospital for hours,
Thanks for paying the gas, electric, & water bill — it’s nice to have hot showers. [:
Thank you.

And,
I love you even though we sometimes fight and argue,
I love you cause I need you and life wouldn’t be the same without you.
I love you cause I can tell you everything, you’re my very best friend,
I loved you when I was a little baby, and I’ll still love you ’til the end.
I love you, cause Ma, without you, I wouldn’t even be here.
I love you not just on Mother’s Day but every day of every year.
I love ya!

Happy Mother’s Day.

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